Besides being one of the few women to secure her place in the historic art world, Italian Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi endures as the visionary behind “Judith Slaying Holofernes,” one of the most gruesomely striking paintings ever displayed. Produced in the early 1600s, the Old Testament story depicts the beheading of an Assyrian general,...

Artemisia Gentileschi seemed to be driven by an unseen, all consuming fire. As a female artist in 17th century Italy, Artemisia never allowed her gender to keep her away from her rightful place among the renowned, but instead allowed it to guide and fuel her life's greatest works. The tragedies and horrors she faced as a young woman ignited somethi...

Thanks to feminist scholars of the last century, Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653) has gone from a footnote in art history textbooks to something of a household name. Her works now fetch sums in the millions. In 2020, London’s National Gallery staged a blockbuster solo exhibition of Gentileschi’s art—the museum’s first-ever show ded...

Tuesday, March 1 at 7 pm. Organized by Casa Belvedere, The Italian Cultural Foundation | 79 Howard Ave., Staten Island, NY. Register in person here, for virtual here. For the excellence of her art, Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1652-3) is among the most prominent Italian Baroque painters, male or female. In a male-dominated art world, this girl - bor...

Women artists played a vibrant and often untold role in Italy around 1600. How did they work and succeed in a male-dominated art world? The Detroit Institute of Arts will explore this question and celebrate Italian women artists with a show devoted to their artistic accomplishments. Artemisia Gentileschi (1593–c. 1656), arguably one of most famous...

“Le donne son venute in eccellenza di ciascun’arte ove hanno posto cura” (“Women have achieved excellence in every art where they have made an effort”) stated the 16th-century poet Ludovico Ariosto. Giorgio Vasari included this quote in the short biography of the Bolognese sculptor Properzia de’ Rossi for his celebrated Lives of the Most Excellent...

A collaboration between the Wadsworth Atheneum and the Detroit Institute of Arts (Dia), By Her Hand: Artemisia Gentileschi and Women Artists in Italy, 1500–1800, is on view now to January 9, 2022, at the Wadsworth, and travels to the Dia, February 6 – May, 29 2022. An exhibition solely dedicated to Italian women artists, now at the Wadsworth Athene...

There are many Italian women who have contributed to the growth of the country's history. They are scientists, writers, activists, rebels and tenacious, a source of inspiration for women all over the world. Writers, artists, scientists. The women who changed the history of Italy take us to explore new horizons of this country. Each with skills that...

When Michelangelo the Younger commissioned a 5-month pregnant Artemisia Gentileschi to paint the Allegory of Inclination on Casa Buonarroti’s ceiling, the fee was three times that of her male counterparts. Her allegorical depiction represented just one of many 'virtues' painted to commemorate the qualities of ‘the Divine Michelangelo’. And it had A...

The Getty Museum recently acquired Lucretia, a newly discovered painting by Artemisia Gentileschi—arguably the most famous Italian woman painter of the 17th century. In this panel discussion, four leading experts on the work of Artemisia Gentileschi focus on the discovery of new documents and the emergence of unknown paintings over the last 20 year...