In 1994, Charlie Manno was assigned to entertain two Italian priests on a trip to Chicago. When the Rocky River man took the priests to the airport after their visit, they wanted to reward his kindness. So, Father Franco Todisco pulled out a notepad and wrote down an old family recipe for infusing lemon and coffee liqueurs. Manno thought nothing of...

It seems like everywhere I look, people are drinking amaro. Maybe you’ve seen Florence Pugh waltzing around Venice with an Aperol spritz. Or you’ve been unable to ignore social media posts about Emma D’Arcy’s iconic “Negroni Sbagliato…with prosecco in it.” Regardless if you’re an amaro newbie or you drink some every weekend, you can’t deny that it’...

In the beginning, it was the Benedictine abbeys to first create infusions using roots and plants in alcohol, bitters to be administered as medicine to stimulate appetite, for example, or to facilitate digestion. There was the famous elixir, the drug par excellence, and then the many liqueurs to fight smallpox, malaria and other infections. Therefor...

Ask any cocktail bartender what fernet is, and they'll likely begin telling you about Fernet-Branca: the most iconic fernet on the market that is typically taken as a shot by bar industry professionals. If you ever see a dark brown liquid slide across the bar in a shot glass and get a whiff of mint, it's likely fernet. What Is Fernet?Despite Branca...

Summer is nearly here, which means it's the ideal time to relax with a spritz cocktail. Your basic spritz recipe includes sparkling wine, soda water, and an amaro — a bitter liqueur. It’s that last ingredient that varies depending on your taste and style, from the sweet elderberry flavor of Saint Germain to the bitter red hue of Campari. The Aperol...

 Disaronno (https://www.disaronno.com/), the world's favorite Italian liqueur¹, is proud to announce their significant expansion of on-premise availability for Disaronno Originale throughout the United States. Disaronno has grown a major presence at 34 new national on-premise accounts, focusing on chain bars, restaurants, hotels and movie theaters....

In Italy, it is customary to pour guests a glass of amaro to signify the end of an evening, with the ritual dating as far back as the 19th century. Most associate amaro with its bracingly bitter taste, but bartenders say it’s an unparalleled spirit within the liquor world.   There are numerous styles and brands of amaro found in each region in Ital...

As the author of a book about amaro, I’ve spent the past five years conducting numerous talks, tastings, and training sessions on the subject of bittersweet Italian liqueurs. And one of my favorite things to witness is the reaction when people enter the room and are instantly hit with the intense, symphonic aroma emanating from the lineup of amari...

After Campari, Limoncello is the second most popular liqueur in Italy. Because of its high sugar and citrus content, it is frequently served after dinner as a digestivo. Unlike Campari, the formula is not secret—in fact, it is so easy to make that it has become a DIY favorite. All you really need are lemon zests, simple syrup, and a neutral spirit...

To drink like an Italian is to slip into an appreciative way of life. The opening gesture to an evening and what is to follow means that the aperitivo—the relaxed appetite-awakener—plays a major role in a culture renowned for their food and drink. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of variations on the theme of relatively low alcohol-by-volume a...