It’s nervy to call something the last of anything, especially when it comes to neighborhoods. But as residents of The Hill in St. Louis see it, their community isn’t just the city’s Little Italy—it’s the last one in all of America. Scusi? What was that? You can almost hear the recriminations and curses coming from North Beach in San Francisco and B...

Mario Scilipoti left his newly wed and, unbeknownst to him, pregnant wife behind in their mountainside Sicilian village when he departed for the United States. The 23-year-old did not speak English. He did not have, or need, a visa when his ship, the Patria, sailed past the Statue of Liberty and landed at Ellis Island. He did not have a lucrative j...

I am pleased to announce the 2021 Italian Week organized by myself and the Italian division at Loyola University Maryland that will be held virtually on ZOOM from February 21 to 25. The topic this year is Little Italies: the Impact and Importance of Italian Language, Heritage, and Culture in the U.S.  Our own Dr. Marc De Simone from Baltimore will...

Construction has begun on site at our Little Italy San Jose Cultural & Museum! Demo around the perimeter, chimney and basement is underway in preparation for the home lifting and foundation work for the "Italian Cellar" basement bar. Also got the massive antenna taken down. We saved 300 of the bricks from the chimney to be repurposed in our Little...

Italian enclaves around the country pride themselves on carrying the title of “Little Italy,” but one young Italian American from St. Louis, Missouri, believes his community is the last true Little Italy — and he’s made an incredible film to prove it! In this week’s episode, we’ll visit “The Hill,” the famed St. Louis enclave that has been a thrivi...

The Convivio Now and Again Series comprises oral histories from Italian-community members. In this excerpt from an interview with Marianna Brunetto, she discusses some cherished remembrances of her time growing up in Little Italy and the impetus that led her to take a leadership role with the Little Italy Association. Without question, Marianna Bru...

By the year 1870, a decade after Garibaldi’s conquest of the Two Sicilies and the year the young nation of Italy was at long last successful in the capture of Rome, several hundred families and individuals formally recognized by the United States as “Italian” could call Boston home.  The city had no “Little Italy”, as so defined, but many in the co...

I may be wrong, and I ask our readers to help me if so, but there is no such thing as a town called "Little Italy" in the United States. There are, of course, many neighborhoods called Little Italy in different American cities, officially or not. But a city officially called Little Italy, to my knowledge, does not exist. Today our interview guests...

While looking through the website of the Museum of the City of New York last week, my eyes fixated on what I thought must be a painting: a colorful, somber scene in Little Italy in 1920—the men mostly standing against a brick storefront while women and children sifted through a basket of fresh loaves of bread on the curb. Which of New York’s many L...

Saturday, December 5th at 5:30pm. GET YOUR FREE TICKET TO WHATCH HERE. With the announcement of restrictions due to COVID-19, the Little Italy Association remains determined to support our businesses and residents while attempting to maintain a sense of normalcy with public health and safety at the forefront. That being said, our time-honored tradi...