It’s time to talk grammar again. This time I would like to tackle a topic that seems pretty hard to grasp if you are learning Italian, but it comes natural to Italian speakers, even though the majority of us would not know how to explain it. “What is it?”, you ask. It’s Ne. I must say that this topic is pretty advanced, so if you’re a beginner, don...

The word rinascita, or rebirth, has never sounded so beautiful. We pronounce it ree-nah-she-tah, and it has the same root and origin as Rinascimento, or Renaissance, that period in Italian and European history that gave us Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raffaello and Lorenzo de’ Medici. Rinascita is a noun that comes from a verb, rinascere (to be reborn),...

Nei giorni scorsi sono stati pubblicati rapporti sulla scarsa efficacia dei corsi online per gli studenti americani costretti a casa dal coronavirus. Ma fanno eccezione i corsi di italiano promossi e finanziati dallo IACE, Italian American Committee on Education, nelle scuole pubbliche e private degli Stati di New York, New Jersey e Connecticut. Da...

COVID-19 lockdown for those of us in the United States meant that pre-planned trips to Italy had to be postponed, collectively breaking the hearts of many Italian Americans who live for their summer trips back to their ancestral lands. While the lockdown, now slowly lifting, was difficult for many, for others it provided a time to make discoveries...

It is known for being used as either "hello" or "goodbye" between family members, friends, and those amongst the same peer group. Although Ciao is seen as an Italian greeting, it has only been to a part of the Italian vocabulary since the 20th century. The Origins of Ciao According to La Gazzetta Italiana, "The word ciao, in fact, derives from the ...

Is Italian truly the most beautiful language in the world? Once the language of philosophy and poetry, up to the point that John Milton could sing “questa è lingua di cui si vanta Amore” (this is the language of which Love makes his boast), in the late twentieth century Italian was certainly the language of football and fashion; but is this still t...

It's becoming increasingly clear that the educational system is facing a crisis, and while there are no clear solutions, one certain way to keep students engaged and successful is by supporting great teachers with passion and proven track records, and programs that enable personal student growth and life lessons. Mr. Lenoci leads the Italian Langua...

Today, I am going to talk about a topic that’s a bit controversial, but very current: the Italianization of words. I’m talking about the current trend many Italians have of inventing new Italian words in order to replace existing words with “Italianized” English words. In this article you’ll find some examples that will help you better conceptualiz...

If there is one thing people have been showing these days, that’d be coraggio (coh-rah-djoh). Its meaning is simple, because the Italian sounds and looks a lot like the English courage, which is exactly what it means.  Coraggio comes from two Latin words, cor, which means “heart,” and the verb habeo, which means “to have”so, at least at the beginni...

Hello everyone, and welcome back to the Italian language column. This month I am going to talk about music! Don’t worry, you are reading the right column, but I was inspired by all the videos of Italians singing at their windows, on their balconies, and to be honest we all need some music to make us happy in our lives nowadays! Since this column is...