INTERVIEWS  

The Italians who arrived in America during the period of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, and then also those who came after the Second World War, had some very precise characteristics. They were poor. They were used to a lot of work. They were able to do extraordinary things with their hands. They were willing to live off what they...

Historically, Brooklyn has always been a very popular destination for the Italian emigration to the US. Many places in Brooklyn were and some of them still are populated by many Italians. Now that this borough is getting cooler and cooler, it still is fundamental for the narration of the Italians in New York. The Federation of Italian American Orga...

Memorial Day is approaching once again, and this year it brings a special interview, for me. As some of you know, one of the reasons I'm so in love with and grateful to the United States is that during WW2 my father, Teodoro "Rino" Mucci, was saved by the American soldiers of the Fifth Army, in the Northern part of Italy. He certainly would have be...

One of the things we appreciate most, here at We the Italians, is the commitment many Italian Americans show all over the US to celebrate and remember the history and the presence of their fellow Italians who emigrated to the US. Oftentimes this passion is shown by organizing events and writing books, but many of them wanted and still want to estab...

There are few people who raise the same respect, admiration and fondness in equal measure among both the two large groups to which We the Italians refers: the Italian Americans and the Italians born in Italy whom then emigrated to the United States. While they have a love for Italy in common, they share slightly different visions of our country. Th...

When you leave your homeland with almost nothing, for a land you don't know, where people you don't know speak a language you don't know, the shock is almost unbearable. That's what happened to millions of Italians during the mass emigration period. The studies about Italian American dialects and how our fellow Italians adapted their way to speak t...

Following the traces of the Italian emigration to the US, we discovered that many fellow Italians went to Lackawanna County, in Pennsylvania. The Keystone State is home to more than 1,5 million Italian Americans, according to the 2010 census bureau: the 12,2% of the entire population of the State.  Starting today, March 12, a new book will be avail...

The story of the Italians in the US, and in particular the story of their contribution to the greatness of America, can be told by several different angles, as we know very well here at We the Italians.   One of these points of view is sport: and when we talk about sport in the US, Baseball is probably the first choice. That is why we are very ple...

The US - Italy Fulbright Commission is a bilateral organization, composed in equal measure by the Italian and American governments, which for decades has been linking Italy and the US, fostering cultural exchanges and helping Italians and Americans to get to know each other better, appreciating their skills and the possibility of join forces. Paola...

There are still many Little Italys in the United States. Some of them are just a few blocks now, other are what's left of the urbanization that brought large roads in the middle of many American cities after the war, several times crashing an Italian community. Every one of them is a place where a big Italian heart has been, is and hopefully always...

When we think about the Italian superior quality in how to educate our children, a world well known excellence is the Reggio Emilia Approach. Launched after the war by Prof. Loris Malaguzzi, it has slowly but constantly carved out an ever-increasing and appreciated space, in a field as important and delicate as that of primary education. The US has...

Imagine 600,000 Italians in America, good honest hardworking people. Imagine them all of a sudden branded as enemy aliens, discriminated, questioned, moved to internment camps. Imagine that they are prohibited to work, to live in their own homes, to travel more than 5 miles. Imagine them forced to prove their innocence, for a charge they don't even...